kampfgruppe:

London, 25th December 1940.

dergrossekrieg:

A poster distributed in Ireland to encourage enlistees for the war effort, circa 1915. 

(by Bart King)

burnedshoes:

© Francis Meadow Sutcliffe, ca. 1890, Untitled

“Trouble with a milk cow is she won’t stay milked.” (proverb)

burnedshoes:

© AP Photo, Dec. 24, 1944, Infantryman, Bra / Belgium

An infantryman from the U.S. Army’s 82nd Airborne Division goes out on a one-man sortie while covered by a comrade in the background, near Bra / Belgium

County Wicklow, Ireland. If you ever needed a reason to find photos of the place your ancestors came from , this is it!

definitelydope:

This Land (by Michelle in Ireland)

Click on the link to Flickr for a map showing where this photo was taken. http://www.flickr.com/photos/finbarro/2389616291

nevver:

Proposal, 1922

Wonderful things, maps.

nevver:

Proposal, 1922

Wonderful things, maps.

  1. Camera: Canon EOS-1DS
  2. Aperture: f/16
  3. Exposure: 1/3th
  4. Focal Length: 50mm

pictoryblog:

My Dad has always been an explorer. One of my greatest regrets in life is to have been born only 2 years before the end of his 20 year long African adventure. Since I don’t have any memories of this time, all I can do is imagine. I found this photo of him standing by the Congo river while going through old cardboard boxes a while ago, and it was like stumbling upon a precious ancient treasure.

— By Romain Perin (submitted to “Are You There, Dad?”)

View the Published Photos from this Theme

It’s not all cemeteries. This is Castlereagh School, taken in 2009.

  1. Camera: Canon DIGITAL IXUS 70
  2. Aperture: f/2.8
  3. Exposure: 1/80th
  4. Focal Length: 35mm

Castlereagh Methodist Cemetery, western Sydney.

  1. Camera: Canon DIGITAL IXUS 70
  2. Aperture: f/2.8
  3. Exposure: 1/320th
  4. Focal Length: 35mm

You could post photos of your ancestors.

You could share photos of people you can’t identify, in the hopes that someone can.

You could share photos and stories of the places your ancestors lived.

You could share photos of all the graces in a (small) cemetery.

You could share photos of the graves of your ancestors.

You could tell stories about your ancestors, or the times they lived in.

You could share snippets from the newspapers of the times.

You could pick an ancestor and describe everything you know about them.

You could pick an ancestor and ask all the questions you need answers to.

You could share pictures and documents about the land your ancestor owned.

You could describe a particularly memorable event in your own life, or in your research journey.

There are many, many possibilities.